Tag Archives: Jordan Peele

Get Out and Oh, Dear

get-out

Well, since we last talked I saw “Get Out” and have been on a deep-dive of listening to interviews with Jordan Peele to learn more about the method behind the madness of his directorial debut.

If you’re looking for non-spoilery talks about it, try his chat with Chris Hardwick on The Nerdist and, after you’ve seen it, just know Jordan Peele and the film are all over the feeds of The Watch, Channel 33 and Pop Culture Happy Hour, deservedly so.

I knew there was a twist and layers to the film, and my first reaction to Peele’s work was that it was an effective mix of genres (horror and satire) and social commentary. On the surface, “Get Out” is a horror film and thriller and I think Peele shared his message, an important one, without taking away from delivering an entertaining and smart story.

Its scares are subtle and the dialogue and plot points are complex which, after soaking up all the media buzz about this film, makes me want to see it again.

As with most horror films, I recommend seeing it in the theater to share reactions with the audience (if you’re lucky enough to not be sitting in front of someone who seemed to be commenting on everything to her date.) Just take it in girl, then talk about it over some tea.

Before I move on to the fact that I watched “Serendipity” for the millionth time recently (okay, fine, I’ll spare you), I have a nugget about Kong: Skull Island to add in relation to my last post.

Comedy nerds probably know Marc Evan Jackson is in the film and that he dishes about it on the latest episode of I Was There Too with Matt Gourley. Do NOT listen to this if you haven’t seen the film, but just know that it’s lovely and is probably everything you expect to hear from these two dudes geeking out about a monster movie.

One thing I learned that you may want to know before seeing “Kong: Skull Island” is that there is another scene after the credits.

As for me, I am glad I didn’t know about it (even though I should have guessed since such extras are pretty commonplace these days), because I want Marc Evan Jackson and only Marc Evan Jackson to be the source of such information in my life.

I wish I had a better segue here, but I learned last night that one of the regular customers at the Edina Cinema and friend to all of the Landmark Theatres in Minneapolis, Larry, passed away.

Larry came in to the Edina Cinema and repeatedly saw the same film, often leaving halfway through. I didn’t know him well by any means, but he would always talk to me like we were friends and then would dish some facts about old movies that I would just love to listen to.

I guess I can’t picture better way to spend one’s time, and I hope it made Larry happy.

“That is all.”