Tag Archives: Sarah Silverman

A Conversation Piece

To quote comedian Michelle Wolf, a blog is a conversation no one else will have with you. I saw her show at Acme Comedy Company the other night and, of all her musings on life and funny stories, this line resonated with me the most.

I got excited because, hey, I have a blog and I like to think I write in a conversational tone that people totally get … wait, was she talking about me? Probably. I am sure Michelle Wolf reads this.

She is right and to take it a step further maybe a blog is a conversation you don’t want to have with anyone. I could talk about my thoughts on movies and comedy with a total stranger if I had at least two hours to prep and then recite it to myself a couple of times. Plus this person would definitely have to listen to a week’s worth of internal monologues I might have about a post just so they know where I am coming from. Then we can talk.

This morning I thought, oh it’s just a typical Sunday … I got up, worked out and ate an apple while thinking about making hash browns for breakfast instead. Then I thought, based on Wolf’s line of wisdom on blogs, would I tell anyone that? No, but it will make a perfect segue to write about “Friday Night Lights.”

Big news – I made it to season three and all I want to know is why are the characters always at Applebee’s watching the news about themselves and trying to get away with murder and stuff? Is Applebee’s run by the Texas mob and are they the mastermind behind that show?

It is good I can get these things off my chest here because I am pretty sure I am the only person who is still watching “Friday Night Lights” and will still want to talk about it even years from now.

I have actually talked in-depth about this next tidbit with my friends and family because I believe I made Todd Barry mad after his show in Madison a couple of weeks ago and I don’t know why.

It was a great show and I told him something to that effect while he was signing my copy of his book “Thank you for Coming to Hattiesburg.” All he said was, “Who’s it for?”

The book is all about being a comic on the road and smaller venues he performs at, including the Comedy Club on State. I didn’t expect anything from my “meeting” with Mr. Barry in terms of conversation, especially since I was nervous and didn’t want to make a fool of myself in front of one of my comedic idols. I wanted him to know I liked his show and I’m a fan, but maybe I should have gone bigger and told him I have a deep obsession with peanut butter or something because I may have gotten the same reaction no matter what I said.

Was it because I shook his hand after he did a bit about being a germaphobe or because we were talking to him and he’s an introvert? Maybe he was dreaming about writing about signing his fans’ books and not having to talk to them in the process? All of this  analysis is not a complaint about Mr. Barry. I respect him and am just as much of a fan, if not more, as before, but I can’t get the interaction out of my head.

I think this look says it all:

img_2207.jpgDon’t hate me, Todd. Please don’t hate me.

I’m an introvert, too, and would be willing to give up on germs if I need to. But not peanut butter, sorry.

Moving on to other things I don’t hate (I guess one perk to actual conversations is you don’t have to say things like that when you can’t think of an effective transition), from comedians I love: “The Big Sick” will be in theaters this month and “Dean” from Demetri Martin has a stint at the Edina Cinema right now.

I am also intrigued by — and probably will love — the new show about stand-up comedy in the 1970’s, “I’m Dying Up Here.” It premieres tonight on Showtime and you can watch the pilot online now. It seems to be getting mixed reviews, but I’ll give it a shot and if I don’t like it (this is probably impossible) I’ll just watch “Crashing” again.

Don’t worry, I have more recommendations of things you should watch to convince you that comedy is the best thing on Earth.

Hot off the Internet presses is the trailer for season four of “Broad City” and “Oh, Hello on Broadway” from Nick Kroll and John Mulaney is coming to Netflix on June 13. As Illana and Abbi would say, “Yas.”

Try Sarah Silverman’s new special on the aforementioned Netflix, or if you’re in the mood to be scared, anxious, depressed and angry over the course of seven hours or so, watch “The Keepers.”

Then pick yourself back up with a deep-dive on Tom Hanks’ Instagram account.  It’s delightful.

Are we done talking now? I thought so. Bye!

(P.S. – Watch Now Hiring with Michelle Wolf on Comedy Central.)

 

58 of 366: I Smile Back

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imdb.com

As a comedy nerd who listens to podcasts as much as I can, I often hear interviews with comedians discussing the transition for comedic actors into dramatic roles and vice versa.

It’s known in Hollywood circles to be harder to transition from comedy to drama and Sarah Silverman mastered it with her performance in I Smile Back.

Silverman plays a suburban wife and mom with two kids who struggles with addiction and infidelity in the film based on a book by Amy Koppelman. The film was a long time in the making and Silverman signing on as the title character made it complete. Her performance has earned the most praise for the film and I agree it takes the story to a higher level.

I Smile Back needed a strong female lead because the film focuses so much on the character of Laney with her husband Bruce (Josh Charles), kids and friends more in the background.

Unfortunately, even after time in rehab, Laney’s struggles are bigger than her family and their love for each other. Laney says in the film that she wonders why anyone would fall in love and have a family and that she often tries to protect her kids from going through the same thing.

Laney’s destructive path is hard to watch and another unfortunate turn is there is not much resolution after it is done.

As I said, Silverman’s performance brings it all together for the film and shows her range between comedy and drama and more importantly to fully embody a character while bringing her own influence to the role (as described in this Huffington Post interview.)

Silverman helped translate the story to the big screen and, while I am more interested in reading the book now to study its origins, it is overall an admirable project her fans will appreciate.